44-B-2016 Williamson's Sapsucker

STATUS
Accepted
DATE VOTING COMPLETED
HOW MANY OBSERVED?
1
DATE SIGHTING OCCURRED
DATE REPORT PREPARED
REPORTER
Kas Dumroese
OTHER OBSERVERS
Found by Deanna Kinziger. Seen on the 26th by Kas and Deb Dumroese
LOCALITY OF OBSERVATION
1480 Old Avon Road, Deary, Idaho
HABITAT WHERE THE BIRD WAS OBSERVED
Yard with apple tree on 80-ac track of mixed conifer forest predominantly ponderosa pine
SIGHTING DURATION, CONDITIONS, and EQUIPMENT USED
Observed from about 1415 until 1445. Clear, calm, cold (low 20s). Sun at back. First sighting about 100', subsequently closed to 30', viewed through 10x42 binocs. Photo taken with Sony CyberShot.
DID YOU TAKE NOTES?
No, not at all
DID YOU CONSULT A FIELD GUIDE OR OTHER REFERENCE WORK?
Yes, later the same day
WHICH GUIDE(S) OR REFERENCE(S): DID YOU CONSULT?
Sibley Guide to Birds (2000)
Cornell "All About Birds" website.
Actually referenced these *before* I went looking for the bird in order to brush up on field marks.
DESCRIPTION OF THE BIRD(s)
Woodpecker. Overall shape and method of climbing trees. Overall brownish bird from a distance, with a paler brown head and distinct bright yellow belly. Back, wings, and flanks were narrowly barred with black and brown; white rump patch reminded me of Northern Flicker. Didn't see the black breast band; instead breast appeared barred as well, suggesting this might be a first winter female. See these two eBird reports; one by me and orginal posting by Deanna Kinziger:
BEHAVIOR OF THE BIRD(s)
Bird flew into an apple tree, and the bright yellow belly was obvious. It fed on apples for about 3 minutes as I moved from 100' away to about 30' away. It then flew to a tall Douglas-fir, landed, and in woodpecker style climbed upward. Briefly out of sight, the bird then flew directly over me, again showing the yellow belly and typical undulating woodpecker flight, into the top of pondersosa pine. It climbed in woodpecker fashion upward into a dense canopy that made observation difficult. It was still foraging there when we left.
HOW AND WHEN DID YOU POSITIVELY IDENTIFY THE BIRD, AND WHAT CLINCHED THE IDENTIFICATION FOR YOU?
Immediately. The bright yellow belly flashed as the bird flew into the apple tree. Once in the binocs, the typical woodpecker shape, barring, yellow belly all indicated female WISA.
HOW DID YOU ELIMINATE SIMILAR SPECIES? WHAT WERE THEY?
If you only saw it flying away, it could be confused with NOFL given the bright white rump patch.
WHAT IS YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THIS (AND SIMILAR) SPECIES?
I have observed WISA, both males and females, several times in Idaho and the PNW.
DESCRIBE YOUR GENERAL BIRDING EXPERIENCE
I've been birding about 30 years and have an above average level of expertise.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (If any)
[Photos on eBird checklists]
WERE PHOTO(S), VIDEO, AND/OR AUDIO OBTAINED FROM THIS SIGHTING?
Photo
SUPPORTING IMAGES

FIRST ROUND VOTING:

Cliff Weisse
Accept

Description and photos support identification of Williamson's Sapsucker.

Shirley Sturts
Accept

convincing report

Dave Trochlell
Accept

The photos verify that this was a female Williamson's Sapsucker.

Doug Ward
Accept

Good description with very good, diagnostic photos.

Jay Carlisle
Accept

Diagnostic photos & well described

Darren Clark
Accept

Photographs are diagnostic

Charles Swift
Accept

No question about it.