38-B-2017 Ruddy Turnstone

STATUS
Accepted
DATE VOTING COMPLETED
1ST ROUND
7-0
HOW MANY OBSERVED?
one juvenile
DATE SIGHTING OCCURRED
DATE REPORT PREPARED
REPORTER
Poo Wright-Pulliam
OTHER OBSERVERS
Jean Seymour saw the bird first, due to the orange legs.
LOCALITY OF OBSERVATION
Toomey Pond at the south end of Camas NWR, we were parked on the east side of the pond.
HABITAT WHERE THE BIRD WAS OBSERVED
pond area with lots of mud.
SIGHTING DURATION, CONDITIONS, and EQUIPMENT USED
We watched the bird for about 5-10 minutes. I took a video with my phone through Jeans Swarovski spotting scope. I use Brunton Epoch 8.5x43 bins, Jean uses Nikon Monarch 8x42s.
It was sunny and 96* with barely a breeze. The bird was in the middle of the pond but seen easily with the scope.
DID YOU TAKE NOTES?
Yes, during the observation
DID YOU CONSULT A FIELD GUIDE OR OTHER REFERENCE WORK?
Yes, during the observation
WHICH GUIDE(S) OR REFERENCE(S): DID YOU CONSULT?
We used the Sibley Guide to birds of North America. Newest version.
DESCRIPTION OF THE BIRD(s)
A turnstone doing what it was supposed to be doing, turning stones. We first noticed the bright orange legs and then the chest with two breast patches and a patterned head with the specialized beak.
BEHAVIOR OF THE BIRD(s)
Definitely a turnstone as it was flipping things as it walked along the beach. It squawked at two other shorebirds that were in its way and continued flipping things.
HOW AND WHEN DID YOU POSITIVELY IDENTIFY THE BIRD, AND WHAT CLINCHED THE IDENTIFICATION FOR YOU?
The orange legs and chest marking helped id the bird but once it started flipping things over, that clinched it.
HOW DID YOU ELIMINATE SIMILAR SPECIES? WHAT WERE THEY?
eliminated most other shorebirds because of orange legs. Head patterns defined it from black turnstone.
WHAT IS YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THIS (AND SIMILAR) SPECIES?
We have both watched this bird on the Oregon coast.
DESCRIBE YOUR GENERAL BIRDING EXPERIENCE
Jean and I have both birded for over 20 years and both often lead bird walks in the local area. I teach a field notes class on drawing birds to ID them. I did sketch this bird along with videoing and photographing it.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (If any)
[Supporting media posted online]
https://scontent-dft4-3.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/21272310_10214669249591883_1268508324335724360_n.jpg?oh=04c5d820fba4e8b4602d80c97b39d25f&oe=5A5B2F74

https://scontent-dft4-3.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/21369520_10214669250431904_5211681756848293106_n.jpg?oh=3feb3d32205e0a912a98e6451e957fc7&oe=5A147C4E

https://www.facebook.com/poo.wrightpulliam/videos/pcb.1413148875450182/10214673866827311/?type=3&theater
WERE PHOTO(S), VIDEO, AND/OR AUDIO OBTAINED FROM THIS SIGHTING?
Photo
Video
SUPPORTING IMAGES

FIRST ROUND VOTING:

Cliff Weisse
Accept

Description and photos support identification of Ruddy Turnstone.

Carl Lundblad
Accept

Well documented with diagnostic photos and a few written details including behavior/foraging actions. The first 2 links (to sketches?) under "Additional Information" did not work for me, but the other documentation was fully adequate. Good timing for this species.

Shirley Sturts
Accept

description and photos confirm the identification

Jay Carlisle
Accept

Diagnostic photos

Dave Trochlell
Accept

I'm convinced that this was a Ruddy Turnstone.

Darren Clark
Accept

Photographs are good

Doug Ward
Accept

Combination of decent write up and diagnostic photos make this one fairly easy.