42-B-2016 Red-naped Sapsucker

STATUS
Accepted
DATE VOTING COMPLETED
1ST ROUND
6-1
2ND ROUND
6-1
HOW MANY OBSERVED?
1
DATE SIGHTING OCCURRED
DATE REPORT PREPARED
REPORTER
Jason Talbot
OTHER OBSERVERS
I found the bird and was alone
LOCALITY OF OBSERVATION
Morris Hill Cemetery in Boise, ID. West Central area of cemetery
HABITAT WHERE THE BIRD WAS OBSERVED
Cemetery with both pine and deciduos trees
SIGHTING DURATION, CONDITIONS, and EQUIPMENT USED
I observed the bird for about five minutes. It was snowing lightly. I saw the bird through binoculars from about 20 yards away in the top of a pine tree.
DID YOU TAKE NOTES?
No, not at all
DID YOU CONSULT A FIELD GUIDE OR OTHER REFERENCE WORK?
No, not at all
WHICH GUIDE(S) OR REFERENCE(S): DID YOU CONSULT?
n/a
DESCRIPTION OF THE BIRD(s)
Woodpecker. Tapping as it clung to the trunk making its way up and around the trunk.
BEHAVIOR OF THE BIRD(s)
Mostly tapping the entire time I watched it. It was the only bird in the tree.
HOW AND WHEN DID YOU POSITIVELY IDENTIFY THE BIRD, AND WHAT CLINCHED THE IDENTIFICATION FOR YOU?
I immediately identified it when I saw it's red nape and throat separated by black and white stripes on the face across the eye.
HOW DID YOU ELIMINATE SIMILAR SPECIES? WHAT WERE THEY?
when I saw it's red nape and throat separated by black and white stripes on the face across the eye. I knew it wasn't an extremely rare Red-breasted Sapsucker because it lacked the extensive red breast and head and did not show signs of hybridization.
WHAT IS YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THIS (AND SIMILAR) SPECIES?
I'm very familiar with Red-naped sapsuckers and see several a year in Idaho.
DESCRIBE YOUR GENERAL BIRDING EXPERIENCE
I've birded for six years and consider myself an intermediate birder.
WERE PHOTO(S), VIDEO, AND/OR AUDIO OBTAINED FROM THIS SIGHTING?
None

FIRST ROUND VOTING:

Cliff Weisse
Accept

Description supports identification of Red-naped sapsucker.

Shirley Sturts
Accept

The field marks given fit those of the red-naped Sapsucker

Dave Trochlell
Accept

I'm (sort of) convinced that this sapsucker was identified correctly, so I'll be interested to read what other IBRC members thought about this description.

Doug Ward
Reject, specific identification not established

Report contains scant details. In addition, I'm not sure the observer understands the location of the "nape" as their description seems to indicate they are discussing the bird's crown. If this is the case, then report does not eliminate the probably more likely Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) during Winter.

Jay Carlisle
Accept

Key fieldmarks described

Darren Clark
Accept

Description supports Red-naped Sapsucker and eliminates similar species.

Charles Swift
Accept

The description including red nape supports the id although a description of the extent of the black throat border would have been helpful in conclusively eliminating Yellow-bellied (or hybrid with Yellow-bellied).

SECOND ROUND VOTING:

Doug Ward
Reject, specific identification not established

Have read committee member notes, and reread the report and stick with my “reject” vote for the same reasons as round 1.

Dave Trochlell
Accept

I'm still convinced.

Jay Carlisle
Accept

no change from round 1 vote

Shirley
Accept

I am still convinced from the description given

Darren Clark
Accept

See previous comments

Cliff Weisse
Accept

Although description is limited I feel it contains enough to eliminate other sapsucker species. In addition Red-naped has been documented wintering at this location in recent years.

Charles Swift
Accept

I understand Doug's concerns however the report although scant seems sufficient (I believe Jason knows where the nape is, the description is imprecise however). It's also worth pointing out the RNSA have apparently become a fairly regular wintering species in recent years in the Treasure Valley with numerous validated records in eBird (a good number with photos).